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How to Use Meditation Malas

November 29, 2021 3 min read

A mala necklace is a string of 108 connected beads or a strand with any multiple of nine (i.e., 27, 54). It is used to cut through the dissonance and quiet the mind.

For our purposes, let’s discuss how you might use a mala necklace. Consider finding a sacred mala necklace or bracelet from a Fair-Trade designer. We partner with Shamans Market for our ethically-made malas.

Using a Mala

First, find a comfortable meditative position, like half or full lotus asana, or with the use of an aid, like a zafu, bamboo bench, or chair. Arrange your body and scan it for modern-day’s traits of poor posture, starting with the spine. Try to elongate and straighten it. Tuck in your pelvis to align with your shoulders to avoid rolling forward which places strain on your lower back.

(Know that sitting for prolonged periods takes surprising stamina to sit ergonomically correct instead of slouching, bending, and leaning. Try our Yoga Poses for Good Posture to encourage comfort during seated meditation.)

Next, place the mala necklace loosely in between your fingers on your lap. Find the guru bead as the starting point. The necklace’s “center” is a guru bead and tassel to mark the beginning and ending of a meditative cycle.

How to Use Meditation Malas | Mukha Yoga

Shop Mukha's mala collection.

A mala necklace is a string of108 connected beads or a strand with any multiple of nine (i.e., 27, 54). It is used to cut through the dissonance and quiet the mind.

For our purposes, let’s discuss how you might use a mala necklace. Consider finding a sacred mala necklace or bracelet from a Fair-Trade designer. We partner with Shamans Market for ourethically-made malas.

Using a Mala

First, find a comfortable meditative position, like half or full lotus asana, or with the use of an aid, like a zafu, bamboo bench, or chair. Arrange your body and scan it for modern-day’s traits of poor posture, starting with the spine. Try to elongate and straighten it. Tuck in your pelvis to align with your shoulders to avoid rolling forward which places strain on your lower back.

Shop Mukha's mala collection.

(Know that sitting for prolonged periods takes surprising stamina to sit ergonomically correct instead of slouching, bending, and leaning. Try our Yoga Poses for Good Posture to encourage comfort during seated meditation.)

Next, place the mala necklace loosely in between your fingers on your lap. Find the guru bead as the starting point. The necklace’s “center” is a guru bead and tassel to mark the beginning and ending of a meditative cycle.

Set an intention for the meditation session. Use this starting point to check in onyou. At this point, decide how you want to use the malas as a meditative tool. Here are a few choices you can use and repeat:

  • Breathwork - inhale for 4 to 6 beats, hold, and exhale backwards from 4 to 6 beats back to zero. Use the beads to count beats.
  • Mantra - Om (which sounds more like AUM).
  • Chant - “Om mani padme hum” or “I am”.
  • Counting - Count slowly with each bead and with intention. (You could enroll in a master class to unravel the religious, historical, mathematical, and philosophical nuances of the auspicious number of 108.)

Place the first bead after the guru bead between your index finger and thumb in a pinch position. Chant, speak, or think the phrase or mantra you chose. Once that moment has passed, use the other hand, the index finger and thumb, to pull it through your pinching fingers for them to rest on the next bead in line. Complete this pattern until you arrive at the guru bead.

Thoughts are fleeting, wispy clouds to the meditator. Flow with the time available. What thought will you place on repeat to try and slow down the spigot of mental chatter?

To learn more, read our article All About Malas.

Tricia Louvar l Mukha Yoga

By Tricia Louvar; All Rights Reserved @2021

Tricia Louvar l Mukha YogaBy Tricia Louvar; All Rights Reserved @2021