Meditating with the Noting Technique

October 25, 2021

Have you ever arrived at your destination and wondered how you got there?

Maybe after your daily commute or just a walk around the block - you turn the key to your front door, and suddenly you snap back and realize you’d been elsewhere?

This is called auto-pilot. It’s a state that we can fall into when we perform the same task many times; we can operate without awareness, without even thinking about what we’re doing.

That default mode setting is basically the opposite of mindfulness and can lead to a feeling of melancholy. If you notice yourself operating in a mindless state, there’s a specific meditation technique that can make a big impact on bringing back your awareness - the noting technique.

What is the noting technique?

The noting technique is a form of mindfulness meditation. As the name implies, it’s about taking note. You use your awareness to recognize and name distractions as they arise. By doing so, you are able to create separation between yourself and the occurrences of your mind. This practice is quiet and non-judgemental.

How to practice the noting technique

We recommend starting with a 5 minute practice.

Come to a comfortable seat and close or soften your eyes. Tune into your breath. Bring softness and stillness to your physical body. Set your focus on your breath. As you become distracted (as you naturally will) try to notice each individual distraction as it arises. Label each as it occurs. Repeat and repeat, becoming aware of each thought, feeling and sensation. Then let it go and take note of the next one.

Noting Technique | Mukha Yoga

The noting technique is a form of mindfulness meditation. As the name implies, it’s about taking note. You use your awareness to recognize and name distractions as they arise. By doing so, you are able to create separation between yourself and the occurrences of your mind. This practice is quiet and non-judgemental.

How to practice the noting technique

We recommend starting with a 5 minute practice.

Come to a comfortable seat and close or soften your eyes. Tune into your breath. Bring softness and stillness to your physical body. Set your focus on your breath. As you become distracted (as you naturally will) try to notice each individual distraction as it arises. Label each as it occurs. Repeat and repeat, becoming aware of each thought, feeling and sensation. Then let it go and take note of the next one.

Noting Technique | Mukha Yoga

Things you can note

Thoughts: A common misconception of meditation is that the goal is to stop thoughts entirely. The goal, especially with the noting technique isn’t to stop thoughts from occurring, but instead to shift your relationship to them. Try to shift your mindset to observation instead of judgement.

Feelings and Emotions: When not addressed, emotions and feelings can lead to dysregulation. In the noting technique, feelings and emotions are labeled as they arise. This creates the opportunity to see your emotions as separate from you, which can put you in a better position to take any action steps you may need to take to resolve them.

Sensations and Perceptions: It’s easy to overlook physical tension and uncomfortable sensations in the body when you are constantly busy. Taking time to note where certain sensations exist can create opportunities to make any helpful changes to improve the state of your physical body.

Becoming mindful of senses outside of you like smell, taste, and sound helps to sharpen your resting awareness and can lead to more accurate depictions of things like hunger or thirst, and need for rest or movement.

Benefits of the noting technique

The primary benefit of practicing the noting technique is that it brings you into the present moment. Practicing this technique requires awareness, which is by definition the opposite of distraction. It will take time, but if you practice this technique regularly, you will find yourself less likely to get lost riding trains of thought. You become more able to step back and observe. This will translate outside of your meditation practice and into your day to day life, leading to a more mindful and satisfying baseline of awareness.

Victoria Maybee l Mukha Yoga

By Victoria Maybee; All Rights Reserved @2021

Victoria Maybee l Mukha YogaBy Victoria Maybee; All Rights Reserved @2021



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