Yoga as Home - Musings of a Digital Nomad

November 04, 2021

“Our homes travel with us. They are wherever we feel loved and accepted.”
- Kamand Kojouri

“Our homes travel with us. They are wherever we feel loved and accepted.” - Kamand Kojouri

That’s what I told my mom when she asked if I’d ever leave home. I was 6 years old at the time. She was joking around, asking thought-provoking questions to see what my first-grade brain would do with them.

I told her I wanted to live with her and my dad until I was 99: as though, just one year short of joining the century club, then and only then, would I somehow muster up the motivation to pack my bags and set off on my own. All of course, ignoring the fact that this plan would require my parents to still be alive at the ripe old age of 132 and 141, respectively.

Imagine her surprise, when her 17-year-old daughter chose a university 5 hours away. Then again, at 21 as that same daughter finished her studies and immediately bought a one-way ticket across the country. And again, 8 months later, with a new ticket - this time across the world.

Just shy of my 28th birthday, I’ll be the first to admit, I never saw this coming. I never would’ve thought that little girl’s math would’ve been so off - but I’m damn grateful that it was.

Victoria exploring in Pai, Thailand.

“When I’m 99 years old.”

That’s what I told my mom when she asked if I’d ever leave home. I was 6 years old at the time. She was joking around, asking thought-provoking questions to see what my first-grade brain would do with them.

I told her I wanted to live with her and my dad until I was 99: as though, just one year short of joining the century club, then and only then, would I somehow muster up the motivation to pack my bags and set off on my own. All of course, ignoring the fact that this plan would require my parents to still be alive at the ripe old age of 132 and 141, respectively.

Imagine her surprise, when her 17-year-old daughter chose a university 5 hours away. Then again, at 21 as that same daughter finished her studies and immediately bought a one-way ticket across the country. And again, 8 months later, with a new ticket - this time across the world.

Just shy of my 28th birthday, I’ll be the first to admit, I never saw this coming. I never would’ve thought that little girl’s math would’ve been so off - but I’m damn grateful that it was.

The last decade of my life has revolved almost entirely around travel. Having touched down in 18 different countries, the lessons I’ve come to learn along the way have shaped who I am as a person. My definition of “home” no longer revolves around a physical location.

Victoria exploring in Pai, Thailand.

The last decade of my life has revolved almost entirely around travel. Having touched down in 18 different countries, the lessons I’ve come to learn along the way have shaped who I am as a person. My definition of “home” no longer revolves around a physical location.

Victoria in Puerto Escondido, Mexico.

It was 2017 when I first learned about“digital nomads”. At this time, it was not at all the norm to work remotely. This was a pre-covid world, where you needed more than a laptop and a wifi connection to maintain a job…or so I thought. Whilst living in Australia, I met one of these elusive creatures. A fellow Canadian who somehow kept her job at home. She’d been on the road for nearly a year, she told me, bumping around Southeast Asia, before settling in Melbourne. All the while, she kept her full-time job. I had so many questions for her. She answered them all.

Coincidentally when I met her, I was nearing the end of my work visa in Australia. I had assumed I’d be leaving my job, and with no source of income, I’d have to head back to Canada. Then, having heard her story, I knew exactly what I’d do next ; rather than quit my job, I’d just take it with me. It sounded too good to be true. Somehow, after minimal convincing, my open-minded boss accepted and even encouraged my proposal.

My yoga practice is now my anchor.

Victoria in Puerto Escondido, Mexico.

It was 2017 when I first learned aboutdigital nomads”. At this time, it was not at all the norm to work remotely. This was a pre-covid world, where you needed more than a laptop and a wifi connection to maintain a job…or so I thought. Whilst living in Australia, I met one of these elusive creatures. A fellow Canadian who somehow kept her job at home. She’d been on the road for nearly a year, she told me, bumping around Southeast Asia, before settling in Melbourne. All the while, she kept her full-time job. I had so many questions for her. She answered them all.

Coincidentally when I met her, I was nearing the end of my work visa in Australia. I had assumed I’d be leaving my job, and with no source of income, I’d have to head back to Canada. Then, having heard her story, I knew exactly what I’d do next ; rather than quit my job, I’d just take it with me. It sounded too good to be true. Somehow, after minimal convincing, my open-minded boss accepted and even encouraged my proposal.

The digital nomad life comes with a steep learning curve. You start off chasing your tail - aka chasing wifi. Things become a lot smoother when you discover co-working spaces. These shared offices around the world are packed full of foreigners living and working abroad.

The part that (figuratively) hit me in the face real quick, was the feeling of being impermanent everywhere. The idea of seeing the whole world was so seductive that I quickly found myself rushing from place to place. When I did make friends, they too were transient. When I found the perfect yoga studio, I knew I’d have to leave it behind. As soon as I began to connect to a person or a place, the impending goodbye stopped me from going any deeper. In a few days time, the people would be gone, and so would I. The places would stay, and I’d likely never return.

I couldn’t shake the need to keep moving, after all, there was so much more of the world to see. I didn’t have the words to explain it at the time, but I knew that something had to change.

It was at this time that I dove deep into my writing practice. I got out a pen and paper every morning and noted how I was feeling. Whilst staring off into Balinese rice field or the volcanic Indonesian skyline, I didn’t feel in awe. I felt invisible.

When I began to find true clarity was when I reflected on what made me feel “at home” within myself. I came to appreciate that there is no place I feel more at peace than when I’m on my yoga mat. Whether I’m alone and moving intuitively or surrounded by others: whether I’m being guided by a teacher, or letting my own body and breath lead - yoga makes me feel loved, accepted and at home.

Victoria teaching a yoga class in Lisbon, Portugal.

It was at this time that I dove deep into my writing practice. I got out a pen and paper every morning and noted how I was feeling. Whilst staring off into Balinese rice field or the volcanic Indonesian skyline, I didn’t feel in awe. I felt invisible.

When I began to find true clarity was when I reflected on what made me feel “at home” within myself. I came to appreciate that there is no place I feel more at peace than when I’m on my yoga mat. Whether I’m alone and moving intuitively or surrounded by others: whether I’m being guided by a teacher, or letting my own body and breath lead - yoga makes me feel loved, accepted and at home.

From then on, I let yoga guide me. I sought my next stop based on where the nearest shala was. I showed up with more openness and less attachment. Through visiting countless studios around the world, and being guided by incredible teachers, I too set out on the path to serve others. Travel inspired me to become a lifelong student, and now, a teacher too.

Victoria teaching a yoga class in Lisbon, Portugal.

From then on, I let yoga guide me. I sought my next stop based on where the nearest shala was. I showed up with more openness and less attachment. Through visiting countless studios around the world, and being guided by incredible teachers, I too set out on the path to serve others. Travel inspired me to become a lifelong student, and now, a teacher too.

I think I’ll always have that desire to roam. I’ll always crave novelty, freedom and new experiences (I am a Sagittarius after all). The difference is that now, I no longer feel like I’m away from home when I travel. I have my mind, my body and my practice. Most of all, I have my true self - the only true home I’ll ever need.

Victoria Maybee l Mukha Yoga

By Victoria Maybee; All Rights Reserved @2021

Victoria Maybee l Mukha YogaBy Victoria Maybee; All Rights Reserved @2021



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